How to mount a photo print for framing or sale in eight easy steps

A salt print of a young female ready for mounting and framing

As photographers mounting and framing our own prints is the culmination of all of our hard efforts at image capture. Today we will be discussing the best, easiest way yo mount your images to mat board in a professional manner. In this way you can either package the print in a plastic sleeve for safekeeping and sale or prep the print for framing.

The image above is a salt print that I produced from a digital file and the one I will be using to mount the print to mat board. I use a special paper for alt process printing that doesn’t warp or crinkle when dried so I won’t have any issues when I go to attach the print to the mat board. By doing this process ourselves we can have more of a physical connection to our work as well ad delivering a hand made product to our customers.

A list of materials for a premium mounted print

When we mount our prints we want to make sure that we use the best mounting materials that we can find. There is no sense in shooting and editing to craft the perfect image and then mounting on cheap mat boards or using non archival materials. While more expensive the better quality materials will last longer and provide many years of viewing pleasure to your customers. You really want to reassure your buyers that your prints will stand the test of time.

The following list contains everything that I use to mount my prints. This list is not the be all, end all of what you could use it’s simply what works best for me in how I want my work to presented to clients.

  • A print. For the salt prints I make myself The paper I use is Bergger Cot 320 8×10 sheets. It is made for this type of alt process work and dries flat without warping and I would highly recommend that. For regular printing I get all of my prints at mpix.com. I have used them for years, Would highly recommend them and they ship prints flat and well protected.
  • Mat and backer board. With these I do not go cheap. I always use archival mats and backer boards. Its not worth it to go cheap and the presentation of your work will suffer. Spend the money and get archival and acid free materials. I use redimat.com for this as they have all the supplies you would want and sell convenient kits that include the mat, backer board, hinging tape and a plastic sleeve for the print. Expensive but worth it because you wont have to track down all of that individually. I highly recommend them.
  • Hinging tape. This is what you will use to attach the mat to the backer board and the print to the mat. My preference again is for acid free, archival tape that is self adhesive. You can also use hinging tape where you have to apply water to make it sticky which is what I used in this example but the self adhesive is much easier to work with
  • Plastic sleeve. Your options are limitless here so I won’t get into what you should or shouldn’t use. Again I use the redimat kits and they come with clear sleeves. Clearbags.com, dickblick.com and bagsunlimited.com are a few places that I have bought them from in the past.
  • Something to sign with. Again this is just personal choice but I am now using a calligraphy pen with black ink to sign both the print and mat. I personally just like the look of the ink strokes but you could use pencil or whatever you like. Ansel Adams signed all of his prints in pencil.
  • Scissors, small brush. It really does not matter what scissors you just something sharp. The small brush is only if you are using hinging tape that needs water to make the adhesive active. The brush makes this step much easier.
  • Dust blower. While not entirely necessary I use one before I seal the print in it’s sleeve to make sure there is no stray bits of dust on the print or in the sleeve.

The eight steps

Now the fun part can begin. After you utilize these eight simple steps all of your hard work will come to fruition in the final packaging of your image.

An example of mat board with alignment markings to mount a photo print

place the mat against a light source like a window and align the print behind the mat opening. In this way you will be able to see the edges of the mat opening and where to perfectly align the print with the opening. With a pencil make light guide marks at the edges of the print on the corners. You will use these guides later to align the print for attachment to the mat. In the image above you can see my pencil marks where the print will attach.

2. An example of mat and backer board placed together and ready for hinging tape

lay the mat and backer board down on a flat surface and align the two half’s together making the seam as tight as possible. There are always variations in size with these and there will be times where the sizing is slightly off. These size imperfections are nothing to worry about, Just align the two half’s as close as you can. Your really talking a variation of 1/4 of an inch or less….the backer board is only there to give the print strength in an acid free environment.

3. An example of mat and backer board that have a hinge and ready to mount a photo print

Using the hinging tape attach the mat and backer board together. You can do this in a few different ways, one giant piece, Two pieces like I did here in the example image or three pieces. I have always done three but here I just wanted to see what two would look like. Apply a thin amount of water to the tape if your using the non self adhesive kind with a brush and carefully hinge the two pieces together. You want enough water for the pieces to be tacky but not so wet that they slide around. In the picture above the tape is still slightly wet.

4. Example of an artist signature in calligraphy style on a photo print

Sign your print. Again this will be personal preference as to what you use to do this with. I have been using a calligraphy pen lately simply because I really like the look of the ink strokes, I think it gives the print a vintage, Polished feel to it.

5. A photo print on a hinged mat board with hinging tape strips and water ready for mounting

Place your print in the guidelines that you made in the previous steps and cut four pieces of hinging tape. You can also tear the pieces of tape but I chose cutting…i just have never noticed a difference in tearing it versus cutting it. Here in this example image I have everything ready…..water and brush, print and mat, And my four pieces of hinging tape.

6. A signed photo print mounted to mat board with a t hinge

Attach the print to the mat with the strips of hinging tape using a t pattern….one strip in a horizontal position, half on the print and half on the mat and another piece in the vertical position covering the half from the horizontal piece on the mat only. In the example image above you can see the t pattern made by the strips of hinging tape.

7. A finished alternative process salt print mounted and signed to mat and backer board

Fold the pieces of your now hinged mat together and lay the print facing up on your work space. You can now sign the mat in the lower right corner or wherever you wish.

8.

A signed and mounted alternative process salt print inside of a plastic sleeve

The final step is to place the mounted print into a protective plastic sleeve. It is hard to see in this example but there is a sleeve! Now you can get sleeves with the adhesive strip on the bag flap or on the bag itself. I always go with the strip on the bag because when it’s on the flap there is the potential of harming the print or the mat.

The final product

So now we have a final piece of artwork that was packaged and presented in eight simple steps. It is daunting at first to add in the steps to mount your work but your buyers will notice the craftsmanship and materials.

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